copyright bastian beyer

column project 

london, 2018

ArcInTex 

 

collaborator:         daniel suarez 

                            soletanche bachy, france

                            biocalcis 

technical support: eurecat, spain 

 

 

The project explores the structural potential of augmented knitted bio-composites based on traditional knitting techniques. the approach allows for an explorative and non-uniform manual material processing whilst generating distinct textile tectonics. the applied knitting patterns are applied according to the expected structural demands.

a transformable, modular workstation, which can operate as a knitting loom as well as a bioreactor, stages the production process.

the structural integrity of the knitted jute structure is established through a calcite matrix which is gradually deposited on fibre level by means of microbiologically induced calcite precipitation, creating a multi-hierarchical composite material.

This process takes place in the bioreactor and is achieved through a biochemical reaction. by successively spraying the soft textile structure with an active bacteria culture and locally triggering the reaction with a secondary treatment a calcite matrix on micro level gradually builds up and solidifies the structure.

this active textile microbiome creates an additional layer within the material hierarchy consisting of the time-based inter-relation between a living microorganism, its “host” material and its environment which could potentially be utilized for future bio-receptive and sustainable materials.

the project can be understood as an architectural mediator of a multi-actor fabrication process, allowing the interdependent inputs from the digital, the microbiological as well as the human body to merge into one co-creating entity.

the project was awarded with the autodesk/ACADIA emerging research award 2018 at the 2018 ACADIA conference in Mexico City.

 

photography: albert palen

 

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 642328.